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Atlantic Refrigeration & Air Conditioning, Inc Blog

How Are Geothermal Systems Installed?

Investing in a geothermal heating and cooling system is one of the best ways to save money every month. Geothermal systems rely on the steady temperature underneath the surface of the earth to reliably heat or cool your home. These systems often require few repairs, and may save homeowners hundreds on cooling and heating costs every year. In fact, the cost of installation may be offset very quickly through monthly savings and local incentives. But while cost is an important factor many homeowners take into consideration when choosing a new system, others are more worried about the installation process. Let’s take a look at how geothermal heating and cooling works, as well as how it is installed.

How It Works

Geothermal heating and cooling systems are also known as geothermal heat pumps. Many homeowners use air source heat pumps, which can also provide both heating and air conditioning. In the summer, air source heat pumps uses refrigerant to absorb heat from the air in your home and release it outdoors. In the summer, the process is reversed, as heat from the outdoor air is distributed into your home. A geothermal heat pump uses a similar process, except heat is absorbed from or released into the earth via a water and refrigerant solution. Because the temperature underground does not change, it’s a more reliable source of heating and cooling, particularly in areas with harsh winter climates.

How It Is Installed

Many homeowners are most concerned about the installation process. The two main components of a geothermal heating and cooling system are the heat pump and the loop field. The heat pump is the indoor component, while the loop field is a set of coiled tubes buried under the ground. The technician buries a set of coiled tubes in the earth, generally in one of two ways.

For many homes, vertical loop field installation is the norm because it requires less space. This requires drilling deep into the ground, so it may be a more costly process than the alternative, horizontal loop field installation. Horizontal loop fields require a lot of outdoor space for installation as long trenches are dug into your property. However, no drilling is required, which generally makes it less costly. In fact, geothermal installation offers some benefits; because these tubes are buried underground, they are not exposed to the elements, which may mean fewer repairs.

To schedule geothermal heating system installation in Ocean City, MD call the geothermal experts at Atlantic Refrigeration today!

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